Thursday, March 12, 2015

Comments left at WBUR after a pro-nuke shill had his sayon "Here and Now"...

Dear Readers,

I'd like to invite you all to listen to a six-minute pro-nuclear shill speak on public radio without anyone presented on the same segment to counterbalance his lies, and then I hope you'll join in the conversation at WBUR, Boston's public radio station, where "Here and Now," the show that featured the pro-nuke shill, is produced.

Here's David Hughes' email from yesterday, alerting people about the show:

At 05:38 PM 3/11/2015 -0400, David Hughes wrote:
>Today on NPR's radio program "Here and Now" Jonathan Cobb from the World
>Nuclear Association was permitted to spew lies about how "clean" nuclear
>power is. In opening the segment, host Robin Young did give the antinuclear
>power critique quoting a NIRS document but did not challenge Cobb's lies and
>did not have an oppositional view represented on the program.
>
>Folks should complain to Here and Now and write comments on the website:
>http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/03/11/fukushima-nuclear-energy
>
>David Hughes
>Citizen Power

Below are some of the comments I've left at WBUR. I think it's a very important place to air your views. I'm sure many very influential people pay attention to the show, as well as a large intellectual community in the area and around the country.

Please let WBUR know they should provide far more balanced reporting, and please help balance their report with your own comments!

Ace Hoffman
Carlsbad, CA

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The tsunami and earthquake "crippled" the Fukushima power plant? That's really all you think happened? Not just "crippled", melted down and spread poisons all over the globe.

Not safe, and not reliable.

The root cause of the accident wasn't just poor planning, it was utilities being cheap in the face of obvious dangers the industry was warned about decades ago.

That's not poor planning, it's criminal negligence -- and 22 reactors in America are being operated by negligent utilities, even four years after the tragedy.

Why not get one of the guys that warned the industry about the dangers of GE reactors on your show, instead of the shill from the industry?

And why did you let him get away with not answering your questions? Worse yet, why did you lead him on when he couldn't give a good answer? Why did you let him lie on public radio?

Nobody on earth is making "good progress" on the problem of nuclear waste. Some countries are pressing forward anyway, that's all.

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So, Rod Adams responds that American reactor operators would have vented: "Vent and vent often."
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This "venting" you speak of is a vile, grossly polluting last resort that should never have to happen anywhere. [Rod later claimed you can drink condensed primary coolant (I'm sure he at least wanted to wait for the N14 to decay, a matter of minutes!)] But aside from that, the events at Onagawa and Daini were not the same as at Fukushima... and perhaps you've forgotten (since all nuclear enthusiasts have a short memory for nuclear near-catastrophes) how close Japan's 7-reactor site came to a meltdown a few years back? Japan was warned about "genpatsu-shinsai" decades before Fukushima, but nuclear power plant operators are in it to make money, they can't solve the waste problem and they can't operate efficiently and safely at the same time. Maintenance at San Onofre was already on a "fix on fail" schedule when its (nearly new) steam generators sprang a leak; the whole plant was falling apart (as pictures in the newspapers showed, with rusting-out main pipes, and leaks fixed with plastic bags and broomsticks). Japan's renewable energy plans include underwater turbines, wind turbines, solar rooftops, geothermal power and a whole lot of things no nuclear backer could love. Had they embarked on a clean energy plan back when America was pushing nuclear power down their throats after WWII, they wouldn't have a quarter of a million displaced nuclear victims right now.

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More pro-nuclear chatter, so I responded thusly:
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The U.S. Government has never released figures for the long-term health consequences of nuclear submarine and carrier work... but oh, the stories we old-timers in the nuclear "biz" have heard, Rod! Look around for your old shipmates and see what they died of: Brain cancers, lymphomas, heart problems, inflammation... look at their kids, the deformities, the childhood leukemias, the underdeveloped brain function.. look at their wives... who simply lived in close proximity to them. Do a SCIENTIFIC study, not one based on hearsay... because the hearsay is pretty damning... demand the government collect and release figures for our nuclear sailors, especially those on board the CVN Ronnie Raygun... and ask why in God's name such studies haven't been done? We STILL rely on the faulty and biased RERF research for estimates of radiation danger. Could be 100 times worse than estimated and no one would notice, but even doubling the danger would wipe out the nuclear industry.

Recently it was determined that the large earthquake (8.0+) risk for California is significantly higher than previously estimated -- above 7% based on studying the behavior of about 250,000 earthquake faults, instead of the old figure, based on studying a few hundred earthquakes, in the 4.5% range. This spells doom for Diablo Canyon, either we shut it down or mother nature does.

You old pronukers can't stop progress and realization, Rod. The public has been warned to keep away from nuclear power. Chernobyl warned us. Fukushima warned us. Three Mile Island warned us, and Al Queda even warned us.

Don't keep pushing nuclear power just to keep the lights on -- it's just not needed anymore. A complete switch to LED lighting alone can save more energy in America than nuclear power produces. So could a partial switch to solar rooftops, or a modicum of wind turbines -- a few hundred would be enough to replace Diablo Canyon.

We are half-way done with closing nuclear power in California, Rod, and for all the right reasons. It's just too damned risky and its proponents can't see the forest for the cemented-over islands in the pacific that were bombed in useless "weapons testing" and whose lethal plutonium will surely start to leak out as the sea levels rise. There are more than a dozen nuclear reactors on the seabed: Thresher, Scorpion, Kursk and many others. And don't say it wasn't the reactor's fault, because A) you don't know that, and B) it doesn't matter. Nuclear power plants are all just accidents waiting to happen. If not to the plant itself, then to the waste pile that mustn't get out yet somehow does, and will, again and again and again for thousands of years.


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...and later, again after a pronuke comment, this time claiming someone else describing radioactive gasses as very poisonous, the pronuker said they aren't. I responded thusly:
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Nuclear power plants are allowed to emit tritium in gas and liquid form all year 'round. But if they exceed the limit set by the industry at "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) and permitted by the NRC, they'll get their wrist slapped lightly with a wet noodle. How much is too much tritium? Not even a teaspoon, if it were in liquid form. (I think the normal annual release per reactor per year would amount to about a thirtieth of a teaspoon, if all were in liquid form.)

That's a pretty deadly gas! Polonium killed Alexander Litvinenko in microscopic quantities, it and plutonium has been delivered to countless tens of thousands of beagles and other animals in gas form: plutonium kills humans in quantities around a few millionths of a gram. All the above-mentioned radionuclides (and many others) do. So those are pretty deadly gasses. The industry is required to dilute them massively before release, and often doesn't have to measure the release until it gets past the site boundary, when it's already been diluted significantly.

And then they don't have to tell the public for at least a year and sometimes forever.


Just thought I'd mention it.


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Rod Adams said we should "recycle" nuclear "fuel." No, we shouldn't:
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"Recycle" means create fission products (some have very long half-lives, I call them the "ignoble seven"). It means risk more meltdowns. It means pollute terribly, the place where the reprocessing is done (if past experience is anything to go on...).

And the thing about renewables people arguing about which renewable energy system is best: They're all good. Can't say that about nukes.

And spent fuel is not "well-behaved." It eats away at its containment from the zirconium cladding on out, with gamma rays (which break down anything including our DNA) and even just with pressure from the helium buildup as the alpha particles escape We're talking about safe storage for tens of thousands of years, or -- with your "reusing" plan, at least for tens of thousands of storage casks (there is enough fuel for >10,000 casks already in America, with about 2,500 casks already in use), each with enough inventory to wipe out a state, each stored for many decades, scattered all over America, at dozens of different sites. That's a lot of rust spots that can develop from the outside, or weld joints that can fail from the inside, or criticality events that can happen from airplane strikes by terrorists causing the cladding to fail and the fuel to pool at the bottom of the dry cask, since most assemblies are "un-canned."


When foisted on the public in the 1950s and early 60s, nuclear power was supposed to be so cheap they wouldn't even meter it: "Too cheap to meter." In reality it's the most expensive energy every invented but most of the bill hasn't been paid yet. Japan has barely begun to "pay" for Fukushima: Health effects from nuclear poisons take decades to show up, and the clean-up at Fukushima will cost tens of billions of dollars and take many decades as well. Not that they have a plan. Robotics hasn't worked, and no one can get near the meltdowns. An ice wall is not a plan to stop the continued fissioning of the cores, and by the time they get it activated, if ever, the storage tanks they've been building will all have begun to leak because TEPCO didn't bother to even double-wall them, or use Japan's famous high-quality steels. (Not the ones used in SanO's steam generators, of course.)

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I suppose this "debate" may go on for a while. Since pronukers invariably make their living from nuclear power (or did, all their working lives), they'll keep at it until the end, until every nuclear power plant is closed, and beyond.

So the more of us that chip in, the better!

Ace Hoffman
Carlsbad, CA



Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Greenpeace saves Belgium, Sternglass passes, Caldicott symposium coming THIS weekend (Feb 28-Mar 1).

Greenpeace is demanding that all reactors worldwide be carefully inspected due to newly discovered cracks in the reactor pressure vessels of two Belgian reactors. Those inspections just might save your life. And even federal nuclear regulators (in Belgium) are saying it could be a "global nuclear industry" problem.

It's good news that the cracks were discovered. It's even better news if it gets reactors shut down permanently. However, it's not good news if something goes wrong: Cracks 7 centimeters in length, starting at the interior wall of the reactor pressure vessel, are serious matters.

Most of the cracks were shorter than 7 centimeters, but more than 13,000 cracks (that's not a typo: more than thirteen thousand cracks) have been found in ONE reactor pressure vessel in Belgium. More than three thousand (again not a typo) cracks were found in a second Belgian reactor.

Two things seem unlikely: First, that either of those two reactors will ever open again, and second, that they are the only two reactors in the world suffering from, or likely to suffer from, this newly-discovered form of cracking (called "material fatigue").

Remember that phrase and demand that your local nuclear power plant be examined for it!

Thank you once again, Greenpeace!

Ace Hoffman
Carlsbad, CA

Article about the cracks:

http://www.dw.de/cracks-belgian-nuclear-reactors/a-18271456


Attachments:
1) Dr. Ernest Sternglass, pioneer radiation researcher, dead at 91
2) Helen Caldicott leads another fantastic symposium everyone can attend!
3) Contact information for the author of this newsletter

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1) Dr. Ernest Sternglass, pioneer radiation researcher, dead at 91
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The New York Times' obituary of Dr. Sternglass was biased and unfair. They used a quote from their own writers to denounce his research into radiation dangers. They even managed to minimize his monumental work in developing methods for using radiation to observe the universe, from bone x-rays to stellar dust.

This man was great, one of the greatest they've ever written an obituary about (and they've written obits about just about everyone important who has passed, haven't they?). This was one of their most shameful.

Dr. Sternglass was one of two pioneering nuclear scientists who became famous for their "anti-nuclear" views, the other being Dr. John W. Gofman, who also lived into his 90s. There were, of course, many other great scientists and still are who speak out against nuclear power and nuclear weapons, but those two had far more than the usual credentials and helped usher in the nuclear age with their work in the industry. They were the ultimate whistleblowers.

I knew both of them, Gofman much more than Sternglass, but I had several conversations with Dr. Sternglass, especially about NASA's awful use of plutonium-238 on space missions (Pu-238 is nearly 300 times more carcinogenic than weapons-grade Pu-239, for a correspondingly shorter period of time). Dr. Gofman estimated that ONE Pu-238 accident by NASA in the early 1960s would result in a million cancers in North America. That was just 2.1 pounds of Pu-238, spread into the atmosphere at high altitude! Imagine the damage if one of NASA's rockets with, say, 72.3 pounds of plutonium were to crash in a late launch accident and spread its poison over a highly populated area, such as an African city (the post-launch climb-out trajectory made such an event quite possible). If Pu-238 is released at high altitude, as in the 1960s SNAP-9A accident or as can happen in a reentry accident during an earth flyby (Cassini did an earth flyby, successfully, and foolishly), it would be impossible to prove WHICH millions of people would get cancer from an accident (among the billions who will get cancer anyway in a global population).

These were the sorts of issues I discussed with Drs. Sternglass and Gofman. Gofman, who isolated the first working quantities of plutonium for the Manhattan project, among a long list of nuclear and other achievements, believed that radiation's medical effects were linear, and that's pretty much proven to be the case over the decades.

Dr. Sternglass, on the other hand, believed that some radiation effects are worse at low doses, which has been more difficult to prove conclusively in all cases. However, the NY Times' obituary made it seem as though Dr. Sternglass's concerns were fantasy.

This is hardly the case. For example, consider the effects of the beta particle that is released from tritium.

This beta particle is (rightly, sort of) described by the nuclear industry as a "low energy" beta particle, and you'll often see the word "harmless" attached to the sentence describing it as "low energy." But "low energy" is relative (and so is "harmless") and it turns out a so-called "low-energy beta particle" can do a lot of damage.

Radiation damage is often measured in the amount of radiation (i.e., energy) that is released per kilogram of living tissue. Tritium's beta particle is considered a "low energy" beta release. What's the connection?

The connection is known as "Bragg's hump" or "Bragg's curve." What it describes is the damage done by a beta particle at any particular speed.

Beta particles are ejected from the nucleus of atoms at the moment of decay and after they slow down, they are common electrons. When tritium (and many other fission products) decays it releases beta particles. (Plutonium releases alpha particles. Radioactive decays also can emit x-rays and gamma rays.)

When a beta particle is first ejected from the nucleus of an atom, a neutron in the nucleus becomes a proton. At first, the beta particle is traveling very near the speed of light. It will slow down tremendously as it flies by hundreds of thousands of charged particles at the atomic scale of matter -- a couple of millimeters at the human scale.

When the beta particle is first ejected and traveling very fast, it is not near anything long enough to seriously disturb other electrons or molecules. (Imagine moving a magnet (instead of a charged particle) very quickly past an iron object. Nothing happens. But move the magnet along the same path slowly, and the iron object will move towards the magnet.)

A beta particle does nearly ALL it's damage at the end of its track, when it's slowed down enough that it stays near other electrons and molecules long enough to spin them around and knock thing out of orbits and so forth.

So each individual so-called "low energy beta release" is just as dangerous as any other beta release. But "total energy dump per kilogram" is considered the standard way to measure ANY radiation damage (with some adjustments for tissue sensitivity, if enough data is available to make such adjustments). And by that measure, tritium's "low energy" beta release means you'll get a lot more beta particles released into the body per total amount of energy released, compared to other typical beta emissions. So the industry's oft-repeated reassuring assertion is actually the worst thing about tritium.

Tritium, with a half-life of a little over 12 years, is probably a lot more dangerous than regulators in many agencies and countries believe. And while I don't recall talking to Dr. Sternglass specifically about his thoughts on tritium exposure to the human body, it could certainly be argued that low doses of tritium are likely to be more dangerous than higher doses of a higher-energy beta release.

Dr. Gofman and Dr. Sternglass were very close friends and I talked to Dr. Gofman about Dr. Sternglass's assertions. The mutual admiration they had for each other despite this seemingly enormous chasm of opinion on a crucial subject was one of the many things I admired about these gentlemen. That they both had to live their lives largely in obscurity for their accomplishments, having been shunned by the industry they helped nurture, is one of the great tragedies of the nuclear age. Everyone should know these giant's names and backgrounds, as much as we should know George Washington Carver did for peanuts, Thomas Alva Edison did for lightbulbs, Nicola Tesla did for electricity, and Westinghouse did for air brakes.

Ace Hoffman
Carlsbad, CA


=========================================================
2) Helen Caldicott leads another fantastic symposium everyone can attend!
=========================================================

Along with giants who were pioneers of the nuclear industry, there is Dr. Caldicott, who probably knows more about radiation damage to the human body than anyone else alive. And nobody shares their knowledge as well as she does!

Tireless (seemingly), her Helen Caldicott Foundation is putting on a unique two-day symposium on "The Dynamics of Possible Nuclear Extinction." Ouch! It's being held February 28 to March 1, 2015 at The New York Academy of Medicine and will be live-streamed, and the public is welcome (URL below).

The list of leading experts who will appear is awesome (shown below), although Caldicott by herself for two days of education would probably be even better! :)

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Moderated by:
Day One: Kennette Benedict, Executive Director and Publisher, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
Day Two: Ray Acheson, Director, Reaching Critical Will

The Presenters (confirmed speakers, this is not the speaking order):

Theodore A Postol- Professor Emeritus of Science, Technology, and National Security Policy, MIT. Striving for Armageddon. The US nuclear force modernization program, rising tensions with Russia, and the increasing danger of a world nuclear catastrophe

Seth Baum- Global Catastrophic Risk Institute, will address the catastrophic risk of nuclear war

Max Tegmark ­ Professor of physics at MIT and author of "Our Mathematical Universe," will discuss artificial intelligence and the risk of accidental nuclear war.

Hans Kristensen ­ Federation of American Scientists, will address the current size of the global nuclear arsenals

Bill Hartung- Center for International Policy, will discuss the inordinate power and pathological dynamics exercised by the US military industrial complex

Greg Mello -Los Alamos Study Group, the role and funding of the nuclear weapons laboratories inherent within the US nuclear armament dilemma

John Feffer ­ Institute of Policy Studies will compare the money spent on the US military industrial complex compared with the paltry amount spent on the prevention of global warming

Alex Wellerstein- Assistant Professor of Science and Technology Studies, Stevens Institute of Technology ­ NukeMap, Personalizing the Bomb- what this means for young people today.

Bruce Gagnon ­ Global Network Against Weapons and Nuclear Power in Space, will elucidate the ongoing and dangerous militarization of space

Bob Alvarez ­ Institute of Policy Studies, will discuss lateral proliferation and describe how a small nuclear exchange could trigger a global holocaust.

Robert Parry ­ Investigative Journalist, Consortium News. Will discuss Ukraine and the Human Factor: How propaganda and passions can risk nuclear conflagration.

Steven Starr­ Associate of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, a board member and senior scientist for Physicians for Social Responsibility. Nuclear War: An Unrecognized Mass Extinction Event Waiting to Happen.

Holly Barker ­ Department of Anthropology, University of Washington, Medical, Teratogenic and Genetic pathology related to US nuclear testing in the Marshall Islands.

Alan Robock ­ Distinguished Professor, Dept. of Environmental Sciences. Rutgers University, will outline his pioneering work on Nuclear Famine and Nuclear Winter.

Janne Nolan ­ Elliott School of International Affairs ­ Hooligans at the Gate: The Checkered History of Arms Control

Mike Lofgren ­ former congressional staffer and author of Anatomy of the Deep State, will describe the merger of corporations and the US government as an underlying cause of the current nuclear situation

Susi Snyder- (PAX, the Netherlands), Author of the 2013 & 2014 DON'T BANK ON THE BOMB reports

Hugh Gusterson ­ Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs, George Washington University will describe his anthropological research over many years studying the culture of nuclear weapons scientists at Livermore and Los Alamos.

Robert Sheer ­ author of STAR WARRIORS will describe how years after his research into the young men who work on nuclear weapons development at Lawrence Livermore Labs "The Madness Persists.

Noam Chomsky, Institute Professor and Professor of Linguistics, MIT will present the pathology within the present political system that could lead to catastrophic results if not cured

Dave Krieger ­ Nuclear Age Peace Foundation on what can we do? How the Marshall Islanders are speaking truth to power. The Nuclear Zero Lawsuits Brought by the Marshall Islands Against the 9 Nuclear Nations.

Tim Wright ­ Campaign Director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) some potential and exciting solutions

Helen Caldicott ­ President of The Helen Caldicott Foundation ­ An urgent prescription for survival

Go here for more information:

http://helencaldicottfoundation.org/symposium-the-dynamics-of-possible-nuclear-extinction-l-february-28-march-1-2015-at-the-new-york-academy-of-medicine/

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3) Contact information for the author of this newsletter
=========================================================

-----------------------------------------
Ace Hoffman, computer programmer,
author, The Code Killers:
An Expose of the Nuclear Industry
Free download: acehoffman.org
Blog: acehoffman.blogspot.com
YouTube: youtube.com/user/AceHoffman

Subscribe to my free newsletter today!
Email: ace [at] acehoffman.org

Please conserve resources: Do not print this email unless absolutely necessary.

Note: This communication may have been intercepted in secret, without permission, and in violation of our right to privacy by the National Security Agency or some other agency or private contractor.
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Monday, February 2, 2015

David Victor, the SCE Community Engagement Panel, and the Darrell Issa Nuclear Waste Dump...

The comments below were left at the KPBS web site in response to their report on SCE's CEP meeting last week.

Ace Hoffman
Carlsbad, CA

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Southern California Edison's "Citizen Engagement Panel" (CEP) has been a cruel joke from the beginning (which is why I stopped attending their meetings as of this year). David Victor has learned little about what the concerns of the citizens really are. Rather, he has done all he can to steer the panel towards approving SCE's plans, whatever those plans might be at any moment. Victor's heavy-handed "chairmanship" of the CEP has included cutting off discussions and silencing activists when the activists refuse to listen to lies. Even when SCE was willing to respond to activist's questions, Victor has cut them off! Engagement? Where? When?


Frankly, the most important thing the CEP could learn -- but hasn't -- is that the nuclear waste at San Onofre is NOT SoCal's biggest problem with nuclear power: Diablo Canyon is. David Victor surely could have learned that by now if he wasn't so busy kissing up to SCE's Tom Palmisano and Chris Brown.


And the so-called "national experts" that were brought in by the CEP to "inform" them are anything BUT "experts" on nuclear waste issues. For example, one was on Obama's utterly useless "Blue Ribbon Commission" (BRC) which could not resolve a single thing about nuclear waste except to suggest that democracy should be thrown out with the waste (in other words, we should force states to accept waste if small communities or tribal areas within the state want to accept money along with the waste). He did not even know that stainless steel canisters can suffer from stress corrosion cracking within just two years, and yet he's considered an "expert" helping the CEP to make decisions for soCal which could impact us for hundreds or even thousands of years!


There is no place in California that is isolated enough to safely take the waste. Transporting it there (wherever "there" turns out to be) would also be extremely risky. But keeping the waste where it is, among millions of people, is utter lunacy. Nevertheless that's exactly what the CEP is really pushing for, with their pie-in-the-sky dreams of an "in-state" solution somewhere, somehow, sometime. If they assume it will be moved soon, then they'll allow less sturdy "temporary" storage in the meantime (when the waste is by far the most dangerous, by the way). The canisters SCE proposes to use are only 5/8ths of an inch thick! 20-inch thick canisters are available but SCE doesn't want to purchase them. They like the thin, cheaper ones, figuring tomorrow's citizens will be the ones to pay for repackaging the waste in a few years, not SCE. Or they figure there really will be an in-state or national solution, even though in 70 years of producing nuclear waste, not one soul has solved that problem or even gotten close to solving it. (There's a scientifically sound reason for that: Ionizing radiation destroys any container you put it in.)


Admitting what a terrible mess we've gotten ourselves into is the first step, and the CEP hasn't even done that yet. If the CEP came out with a strong statement suggesting Diablo Canyon shut down because they're just making their waste problem worse and we here near SanO know that's a bad thing, then the CEP will have at least accomplished something. Right now the CEP is destructive to the goal of engaging the community.

=======================================================
Comments about the above newsletter:
=======================================================

At 08:22 PM 2/2/2015 +0000, David Bear wrote:
Hey Ace,
Here's my comment:
It will cost $1.00 per atom fissioned to pay for shutdown, decommissioning, and disposal of all the nuke plants.
What's that you say?  That's too high a number? There isn't enough money on the planet to pay for that?

Okay, how about this: It will cost $0.10 per atom fissioned. Still too high?

Okay, how about $0.01 per atom fissioned. No?

How about 1/1,000th of a penny?

1/1,000,000th of a penny?

1/1,000,000,000th of a penny?

1/1,000,000,000,000th of a penny?

Still too high?  Yep.
There isn't enough money on the planet to do it right.

- David Bear
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From Penny McCracken:

Hi Ace:

I have a correspondent who lives near Diablo Canyon. He furnished the info that, in case of it being necessary to evacuate the citizens, there is only one, two-lane road! It would quickly turn into a mass of stuck cars going nowhere, and its occupants would, I assume, get viciously irradiated along with their cars. And there's also a newly-discovered earthquake fault off shore, very likely to produce a Fukushima-like problem. We saw how quickly the tsunami overwhelmed the Fukushima tsunami wall - and there, in the most technologically capable nation in the world, they didn't stand a chance. So, possibly, the people trying to evacuate could be drowned before they died of radiation poisoning!

=================================================

-----------------------------------------
Ace Hoffman, computer programmer,
author, The Code Killers:
An Expose of the Nuclear Industry
Free download: acehoffman.org
Blog: acehoffman.blogspot.com
YouTube: youtube.com/user/AceHoffman

Subscribe to my free newsletter today!
Email: ace [at] acehoffman.org


Note: This communication may have been intercepted in secret, without permission, and in violation of our right to privacy by the National Security Agency or some other agency or private contractor.
-----------------------------------------